questionall:

A republican with a heart - I didn’t think they existed anymore.

questionall:

A republican with a heart - I didn’t think they existed anymore.

(via holygoddamnshitballs)

23 July 2014 ·

(Source: lainafaery)

23 July 2014 ·

victoriousvocabulary:

AMISSIO
[noun]
1. loss; something that is lost; no longer possessed or retained.
2. deprivation; dispossession.
Etymology: Latin āmissiō.
[Daniel Conway]

victoriousvocabulary:

AMISSIO

[noun]

1. loss; something that is lost; no longer possessed or retained.

2. deprivation; dispossession.

Etymology: Latin āmissiō.

[Daniel Conway]

23 July 2014 ·

sandandglass:

Graham Norton, Lena Dunham, and Idris Elba help an audience member reply to a text message. 

(via detenebrate)

23 July 2014 ·

nohnoelle:

How To Train Your Humans

nohnoelle:

How To Train Your Humans

(Source: epic-humor, via tbrig)

23 July 2014 ·

"I’ve always envied people who sleep easily. Their brains must be cleaner, the floorboards of the skull well swept, all the little monsters closed up in a steamer trunk at the foot of the bed."

~ Benioff, David. City of Thieves. (via wordsnquotes)

(via cat-with-antlers)

22 July 2014 ·

"How do we forgive our fathers? Maybe in a dream. Do we forgive our fathers for leaving us too often, or forever, when we were little? Maybe for scaring us with unexpected rage, or making us nervous because there never seemed to be any rage there at all? Do we forgive our fathers for marrying, or not marrying, our mothers? Or divorcing, or not divorcing, our mothers? And shall we forgive them for their excesses of warmth or coldness? Shall we forgive them for pushing, or leaning? For shutting doors or speaking through walls? For never speaking, or never being silent? Do we forgive our fathers in our age, or in theirs? Or in their deaths, saying it to them or not saying it. If we forgive our fathers, what is left?"

~ Thomas Builds-the-Fire from the film Smoke Signals (via yesixicana)

From the movie Smoke Signals. Excellent movie.

(via raisonneuse)

21 July 2014 ·

factota:

fuck

Welp, looks like i am bustin out the Firefly DVDs this week.

(via counting-dollars-counting-stars)

21 July 2014 ·

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

(via diem-the-kitty)

21 July 2014 ·

asylum-art:

 Fantasy Wire Fairy Sculptures by Robin Wight

(via coffeeandsleeping)

21 July 2014 ·

catsbeaversandducks:

Post-it Notes Left on the Train

Writer and illustrator October Jones, the creative genius behind Text From Dog and these funny train commute doodles, is at it again with these hilarious motivational post-it notes that he leaves on the train and in other random places.The upbeat doodles, which star Jones’ adorable character Peppy the Inspirational Cat, convey positive and funny messages meant to motivate daily commuters. Whether you’re feeling the Monday blues or in need of some encouragement, Jones’ delightful post-it notes are sure to brighten your day and remind you just how awesome you are.

Via My Modern Metropolis 

(via coffeebuddha)

21 July 2014 ·

gradientlair:

bluedogeyes:

Captain Uhura should have been a thing 

(via S.T. Enterprise D Bridge Restoration)

EPIC.

(via odinsblog)

21 July 2014 ·

(Source: latinorebels, via mommapolitico)

20 July 2014 ·

holesinthefoam:

I could not have said it better myself. 
http://goo.gl/VzDaI5

holesinthefoam:

I could not have said it better myself.

http://goo.gl/VzDaI5

(via foulmouthedliberty)

20 July 2014 ·

rnegastar:

WHAT A TIME TO BE ALIVE

rnegastar:

WHAT A TIME TO BE ALIVE

(via counting-dollars-counting-stars)

19 July 2014 ·

About Me

Feeder of kitties. Grower of plants. Reader. Watcher. Loner. Writer of silly prose. Whovian. Shameless Supernatural fan. INFJ. Occasional and reluctant student, part time massage therapist and full time dork. Here we have all the stuff I think is funny or beautiful or important enough to share. It is a small peek into the workings of my head.

Stuff I Like

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